37,447
pets' lives saved since becoming no-kill in
January 2002

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Richmond SPCA

Robins-Starr
Humane Center

2519 Hermitage Road
Richmond, VA 23220
804-643-6785

 Adoption Hours
Mon. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tue. - Fri. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sat. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sun. 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.
 
Lora Robins Gift Shop Hours
Mon. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tue. - Fri. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sat. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sun. 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Donation Drop Off Hours
Mon. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tue. - Fri. 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sat. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sun. 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Clinic for Compassionate Care
Closed Holidays
Mon., Thurs., Fri
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tues., Wed.
8 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Admissions Hours
Mon. - Fri. by appointment.
Administrative Hours
Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
National Federation of Humane Societies, Member Or

Richmond SPCA and Hanover County Partner to Save Lives
June 30, 2008

Formed in 2002, our partnership with Richmond City Animal Care and Control has saved thousands of pets’ lives. The partnership was dedicated to achieving a live release (adoption) rate of 75% or more, with no healthy, homeless animal dying in Richmond City by 2008 through adoption, rehabilitation, and an aggressive, low-cost spay/neuter effort. Thousands of pets have been transferred from Richmond Animal Care and Control to the Richmond SPCA and other private humane societies through the partnership, and the City of Richmond achieved a live release rate in 2006, two years early, of 76%. Richmond is now one of the four safest cities in the country for orphaned pets, according to Maddie's Fund.

Our long range plan includes the expansion of the Richmond no-kill model to our surrounding counties. We are pleased to announce a partnership with Hanover County Animal Control that will dramatically increase that county's live release rate. This program will be modeled after our partnership with Richmond Animal Care and Control and has an aggressive goal to save the life of every healthy homeless animal in Hanover County within 12 months, with additional goals to follow.

This partnership was formally approved by the Hanover County Board of Supervisors on June 25, 2008. It will provide a roadmap for the Richmond SPCA and Hanover Animal Control to work cooperatively and productively to end the euthanization of healthy and treatable homeless dogs and cats, whether stray or owner surrendered or abandoned, within Hanover County.

Success will have been achieved when every healthy homeless cat or dog entering either party’s shelter is placed in a home and none is euthanized because of lack of space or the passage of time. A secondary goal of the partnership is to place every treatable homeless cat or dog entering either party’s shelter in a responsible and loving home. This partnership will welcome the inclusion of other private humane organizations to help reduce the number of orphaned animals being euthanized in Hanover County.

Hanover County Animal Control's Role

Hanover County’s Animal Control is the governmental department responsible for: (i) addressing public safety issues with respect to animals in the County including the pick up of dogs at large in the County, (ii) investigating and resolving animal abuse and neglect matters, (iii) acting as the receiving point for stray and the majority of owner relinquished dogs and cats in the County, (iv) enforcing Virginia’s animal laws and the County’s animal control ordinances, (v) sheltering animals not currently available for adoption due to pending stray periods, legal actions, or health issues, and (vi) performing euthanasia of dogs and cats that are not healthy or that no private humane organization (whether that be the Richmond SPCA or another private humane organization) accepts for treatment and rehabilitation.

The Richmond SPCA's Role

The Richmond SPCA is a private non-profit humane society that accepts the responsibility for: (i) providing a low cost, high volume spay/neuter clinic for the Richmond Metropolitan Area community, (ii) providing substantial programs of humane education to the children and adults of the community, (iii) accepting from Hanover Animal Control healthy dogs and cats that Hanover Animal Control does not choose to adopt to a responsible home itself nor to transfer to any other private humane organization (iv) adopting all such animals described in (iii) above to responsible and loving homes, and (v) accepting certain sick and injured animals from Hanover Animal Control that the Richmond SPCA will undertake to treat and rehabilitate and return to a healthy condition for adoption.

Definitions

Healthy: The term “healthy” means and includes all dogs and cats eight weeks of age or older that, as determined by Hanover Animal Control, at or subsequent to the time the animal is taken into possession, have manifested no sign of a behavioral or temperamental characteristic that could pose a health or safety risk or otherwise make the animal unsuitable for placement as a pet, and have manifested no sign of disease, injury, a congenital or hereditary condition that adversely affects the health of the animal or that is likely to adversely affect the animal’s health in the future.

Treatable: The term “treatable” means and includes all dogs and cats that are “rehabilitatable” and all dogs and cats that are “manageable,” as determined by Hanover Animal Control.

Rehabilitatable: The term “rehabilitatable” means and includes all dogs and cats who are not “healthy,” but who are likely to become “healthy,” if given medical, foster, behavioral, or other care equivalent to the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community; or

Manageable: The term “manageable” means and includes all dogs and cats who are not “healthy” and who are not likely to become “healthy,” regardless of the care provided; but who would likely maintain a satisfactory qualify of life, if given medical, foster, behavioral, or other care, including long-term care, equivalent to the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community; provided, however, that the term “manageable” does not include any dog or cat who is determined by Hanover Animal Control to pose a significant risk to human health or safety or to the health or safety of other animals.

Unhealthy and Untreatable: The term “unhealthy and untreatable” means and includes all dogs and cats who, at or subsequent to the time they are taken into possession, are determined by Hanover Animal Control

a. To have a behavioral or temperamental characteristic that poses a health or safety risk or otherwise makes the animal unsuitable for placement as a pet, and are not likely to become “healthy” or “treatable” even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community; or

b. To be suffering from a disease, injury, or congenital or hereditary condition that adversely affects the animal’s health or is likely to adversely affect the animal’s health in the future, and not likely to become “healthy” or “treatable” even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community; or

c. To be under the age of eight weeks and not likely to become “healthy” or “treatable,” even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community.

We are so pleased to be working with Hanover County to save the lives of homeless animals and look forward to a successful partnership.

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